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Recovery Process

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Recovery process


In general, your orthopaedic surgeon will encourage you to use your “new” joint shortly after your operation. After total hip or knee replacement, you will often stand and begin walking the day after surgery. Initially, you will walk with a walker, crutches, or a cane.
Most patients have some temporary pain in the replaced joint because the surrounding muscles are weak from inactivity and the tissues are healing. This will end in a few weeks or months.
Exercise is an important part of the recovery process. Your orthopaedic surgeon or the staff will discuss an exercise program for you after surgery. This varies for different joint replacements and for differing needs of each patient.
After your surgery, you may be permitted to play golf, walk, and dance. More strenuous sports, such as tennis or running, may be discouraged.
The motion of your joint will generally improve after surgery. The extent of improvement will depend on how stiff your joint was before the surgery.

What are the possible Complications?
Tell your orthopaedic surgeon about any medical conditions that might affect the surgery. Joint replacement surgery is successful in more than 9 out of 10 people. When complications occur, most are successfully treatable.
Possible complications include the following

Infection
Infection may occur in the wound or deep around the prosthesis. It may happen while in the hospital or after you go home. It may even occur years later. Minor infections in the wound area are generally treated with antibiotics. Major or deep infections may require more surgery and removal of the prosthesis.
Any infection in your body can spread to your joint replacement.

Blood Clots
Blood Clots result from several factors, including your decreased mobility causing sluggish movement of the blood through your leg veins. Blood clots may be suspected if pain and swelling develop in your calf or thigh. If this occurs, your orthopaedic surgeon may consider tests to evaluate the veins of your leg. Several measures may be used to reduce the possibility of blood clots, including:

  • Blood thinning medications (anticoagulants)
  • Elastic stockings
  • Exercises to increase blood flow in the leg muscles
  • Plastic boots that inflate with air to compress the muscles in your legs

Despite the use of these preventive measures, blood clots may still occur. If you develop swelling, redness or pain in your leg following discharge from the hospital, you should contact your othopaedic surgeon.

Loosening
Loosening of the prosthesis within the bone may occur after a total joint replacement. This may cause pain. If the loosening is significant, a revision of the joint replacement may be needed. New methods of fixing the prosthesis to bone should minimize this problem.

Dislocation
Occasionally, after total hip replacement the ball can be dislodged from the socket. In most cases, the hip can be relocated without surgery. A brace may be worn for a period of time if a dislocation occurs. Most commonly, dislocations are more frequent after complex revision surgery.

Wear
Some wear can be found in all joint replacements. Excessive wear may contribute to loosening and may require revision surgery.

Prosthetic Breakage
Breakage of the metal or plastic joint replacement is rare, but can occur. A revision surgery is necessary if this occurs.

Nerve Injury
Nerves in the vicinity of the total joint replacement may be damaged during the total replacement surgery, although this type of injury is infrequent. This is more likely to occur when the surgery involves correction of major joint deformity or lengthening of a shortened limb due to an arthritic deformity. Over time, these nerve injuries often improve and may completely recover.

How do you prepare for total Joint Replacement?
Before surgery, your orthopaedic surgeon will make some recommendations, such as suggesting that you:

  • Donate some of your own blood so that, if needed, you may receive it during or after surgery
  • Stop taking some drugs before surgery
  • Begin exercises to speed your recovery after surgery
  • Evaluate your need for discharge planning, home therapy and rehabilitation after surgery

Is total joint Replacement Permanent?
Most older persons can expect their total joint replacement to last a decade or more. It will give years of pain-free living that would not have been possible otherwise.
Younger joint replacement patients may need to second total joint replacement. Materials and surgical techniques are improving through the efforts of orthopaedic surgeons working with engineers and other scientists.
The future is bright for those who choose to have a total joint replacement to achieve an improved quality of life through greater independence and healthier pain-free activity.
Your orthopaedic surgeon is a medical doctor with extensive training in the diagnosis and nonsurgical and surgical treatment of the musculoskeletal system, including bones, joints, ligaments, tendons, muscles, and nerves.